How To Network

June 27, 2017

One of the most important skills to develop and use as a professional scientist is networking.  It is valuable for making important connections related to your research, learning about job opportunities or gathering information about graduate school applications.  This summer, the OITE will be holding several opportunities for you to meet the diverse group of trainees and fellows from across the NIH such as Get Cool and Get Connected (Popsicles!) and Think, Ink and Network events.  You can also use your skills during the Graduate and Professional School fair, and Summer Poster Day programs.

For some, the act of approaching a stranger and starting a conversation is easy. For others, especially those who are quiet or do not speak the language fluently, it can be stressful. Networking is about developing professional relationships with colleagues.  Therefore, you can use many of the same strategies as you would when making a new professional friend.   Here are some additional tips to help you when you are meeting new colleagues at receptions, poster sessions, conferences, job interviews, career or graduate school fairs, and meet ups.

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Find something in common:  Two things that you have in common with most people at NIH is that you are interested in science and conducting research.  In addition, most of you will be in college or graduating soon.  These are all conversation starters.

Maximize your personal style: Think about your personal style and use skills that maximize your strengths. As mentioned, extroverted types may be comfortable initiating conversations.  However,  introverts and ambiverts have many strengths and areas for improvement during networking.   If you prefer to meet people as part of a group or at a quieter place, then do that.

Memorize a list of highlights:  Once you have a list, it will be easy to recall your highlights in each situation.  Here are some suggested topics to use when you want to strike up a conversation.

  • Name
  • Current Job? What are you working on?
  • What is a current issue in science, the media, or the conference that interests you?
  • Goal or reason for introducing yourself?
  • How can they help you?

Review the 2012 Networking Maps blog:   Using the strategy of mapping will help you to develop a strategy to determine in what sphere the connection is in so you can plan how you want to start a conversation.

Connect with people who you already know first.  They will introduce you to others. To become comfortable, begin chatting with someone that you already know.  Often, they will know others and can introduce you.   

Keep the relationship alive:  Obtain their contact information before the event is over. Bring business cards or your resume with you.  Offer to connect with them through LinkedIn, use your  cell phone to collect their information.  Next, drop a thank you note within the next 24-48 hours with a request to set up another opportunity to talk in person or electronically.

Branch Out:   Branch out beyond walls of your lab.  Utilize the NIH community, alumni, join NIH SIGS, attend conferences, and other OITE events.

 


Welcome Summer Interns: OITE Blogs of Interest

June 19, 2017

 

The Office of Intramural Training and Education (OITE) of the NIH extends a warm welcome to the Summer 2017 interns. Over the next few months, you will engage in many unique opportunities in biomedical research that will encourage you to consider pursuing careers and further graduate study in the field.  As you are settling in to your lab and meeting your PIs and fellow trainees, we want to make sure that you are aware of a variety of helpful blog posts that will help you to maximize your summer experience.

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Getting oriented to a new lab and role as a researcher is both exciting and somewhat challenging for summer interns. We suggest reading the blog Understanding the Impact of Change to learn about the key factors associated with any transition.  Next read Making the Most of Your Transition to the NIH.

One of the challenges in most careers is how to achieve a healthy work-life balance. The OITE Director and our wellness programming staff encourage you to review our model of wellness and managing stress as part of your training to be a successful scientist.

Meeting your new mentor is another opportunity that you will have this summer. To prepare yourself for this essential growth opportunity, we suggest reading the blogs on Identifying Mentors and Learning How To Make the Most of Mentoring Relationships.

Career decision making and pursuing graduate or professional school options are also areas that which you will embrace during the summer.  In addition to utilizing the resources at your college and university during the academic year, the OITE Career Services Center has career counselors who will help you explore you assess how your values, interests, and skills relate to healthy career decision making and/or develop CV, resumes, and practice interviewing skills.   We also offer pre-professional advisors who will help you to prepare you to apply for graduate or professional school.  Stay tuned for a blog post that will prepare you for the Graduate and Professional School Fair on July 18, 2017 where representatives from a number of schools will come to NIH to meet you and share information about their programs.

We look forward to working with you this summer. Visit the OITE website for further information.  For our readers who are alumni or outside of the NIH, we encourage you to seek similar services through your training director, or your college and university or in the community.


Happy Pride! Helpful Career Resources for LGBTQ Scientists and Allies

June 5, 2017

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In 2014, to recognize Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride month, the OITE Careers Blog published a post addressing job search and work environments for LGBTQ scientists called Happy Pride!  This blog issue provides useful resources for scientists, their families, and allies in support of inclusive career decision-making and work environments.

LGBTQ Employment and Training Opportunities: In addition to the helpful employment resources referred to in the in the 2014 Happy Pride blog (see above), here are some additional resources:

National Organization of Gay and Lesbian Scientists and Technology Professionals (NOGLSTP).  A professional association that provides a listing of  career opportunities for LGBTQ science and technology graduates, mentoring, fellowships, and other forms of support.

New Scientist has published a useful article highlighting LGBT employers in the sciences.

GoAbroad.com published an article with links to an excellent on-line LGBT Student Guide to Studying Abroad that provides resources and helpful information that will help LGBT community members prepare to go abroad for studies.  The guide is also useful for international applicants seeking knowledge about LGBT safe communities across the world.

The Association of International Educators (NAFSA) published an informative article written for allies of LGBTQ international students regarding the specific needs of this population when they arrive to the US and later return to their home countries.

PFLAG International extends its advocacy for LGBT individuals and families globally.  This is a useful resource for LGBT individuals and allies who are preparing to go abroad for short or extended periods of time.

Preferred Gender Pronouns:   When applying for internships, jobs, graduate school, and/or professional schools, you may notice a question related to gender pronouns is added. This question allows applicants an option to request their preferred gender pronouns to use when referring to them.  Colleges, universities, and human rights organizations provide excellent resources used in ally trainings for students, faculty and staff about using gender neutral pronouns.

Ally Training: Many organizations (including the NIH Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion) offer Safe Zone training that can allow allies the opportunity to learn more about the LGBTQ community and assist in the creation of a more welcoming environment.

LGBTQ Terminology:  One way to contribute to a culture of inclusion and respect for community members is to become aware of accepted terms to refer to members of the LGBTQ community. The human rights organization, PFLAG, publishes a terminology glossary  that is a useful reference to learn about the latest acceptable terms.

As you can see, it is important for job seekers and their allies to address LGBTQ-related topics in order to keep stress from derailing their life, job search, and/or educational process.  The OITE offers career development workshops and/or career, wellness, and pre-professional services. We suggest that you learn when to seek counseling from our office or the NIH Employee Assistance Program.  We encourage you to register for the Workplace Dynamics: Diversity in a Multicultural Society workshops and/or join the NIH LGBT Fellows and Friends (LGBT-FF) community.  Not at NIH?   We recommend using resources offered by your college and university or local community centers. It can be helpful to chat with other professionals who have been through this process to seek advice and support. Out for Work and Out and Equal Workplace Advocates are two good introductory resources.

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