Job Searching While Pregnant

Pregnancies can bring joy and excitement along with new responsibilities and new worries. Searching for a job is not an easy task; however, it becomes even a little more complicated when you are expecting.

There are often tough decisions and a variety of factors to consider throughout the process, such as:

Sharing Your News or Not?

If you are in your second or third trimester and visibly showing, then this decision is often made for you. Employers will figure it out when you show up to an interview with a bump. Even so, many women struggle with the timing of revealing a pregnancy to a potential employer. Should you be upfront with your employer as early as a phone interview? Or should you hold off until you have an offer in hand? Obviously the answer will vary greatly for each individual depending on her situation.

Many women who aren’t overtly showing want the hiring manager to get excited about their skills and qualifications first and foremost before sharing their news. By law, a company can’t deny you employment because you are pregnant; furthermore, you are not legally required to disclose that you are expecting. Often times though, even if you are a stellar applicant, many employers will view your pregnancy and upcoming maternity leave as an inconvenience and an offer won’t be extended. While this is illegal, it can be difficult to prove that was the reason behind a company’s rejection.  Most companies and recruiting managers will automatically bring in legal counsel regarding personnel/hiring situations as a precaution.

At some point, you will have to share your news, but the timing of this is often a very personal decision. If you are lucky enough to do so, starting a job search early is ideal. Conducting a job search early on in your pregnancy can be easier because you will be able to avoid these potentially awkward conversations and it will also allow you more time to review the benefits of potential employers.

Assessing a Job’s Benefits

Now, more than ever, medical insurance options and leave benefits will be at the forefront of your mind. Many employers have specific guidelines about when employees are eligible for certain benefits. For example, some employers don’t grant maternity leave benefits unless you have been in the job for at least one year. These are all factors to consider ensuring you and your little one are covered.

Many companies in America, including the federal government, don’t even have an official leave policy for new mothers forcing them to use some combination of vacation/sick/short-term disability/FMLA leave. The challenges that pregnant mothers and new moms face has been highlighted in a Washington Post article, “The Sad State of Benefits for New Moms on the Job.” This article highlights the case of Peggy Young, a UPS driver who recently sued the company under the Pregnancy Discrimination Act.

When job searching, the truth is that you are often not privy to a company’s full benefits package until an official offer has been extended. The importance of evaluating maternity leave, prenatal care, and child care options are often paramount for pregnant job seekers.

There is no “right” way to approach a job search while pregnant and many women successfully look for and land a job during this time. For women who have gone through this process, what did you find helpful? How did you manage morning sickness and interviewing at the same time? We’d love to hear your challenges and successes. Leave a comment or email amanda.dumsch@nih.gov.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: